Twins in Horses: Risks and Management

Twins in Horses: Risks and Management

Whinny’s Wisdoms

Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic

Hi there! It’s Winnie the Clinic Mouse, and guess what? I’m a quintuplet, which means I have four siblings who were born at the same time as me! It’s quite a busy and exciting life, having so many siblings. But that’s not all—one of our veterinarians, Dr. Carter, is a twin! It’s fascinating to see how different species experience multiple births!

In the world of mammals, many of us can have multiple babies at once. For mice like me, having a bunch of siblings born together is pretty normal. But for horses, it’s a whole different story. While some mammals handle multiple births with ease, twin pregnancies in horses can be very dangerous.

Causes of Twin Pregnancies

Twin pregnancies in horses occur when two ova are fertilized simultaneously. This happens when a mare double ovulates or releases two eggs. While this may sound like an advantage for breeding, it often leads to complications.

Risks Associated with Twin Pregnancies

The main risks of twin pregnancies in horses include:

  • Abortion: The majority of twin pregnancies end in early embryonic loss. The limited space and nutrient availability within the uterus make it challenging for both embryos to survive.
  • Dystocia (difficult birth): If the pregnancy continues to term, the mare is at a higher risk of dystocia, which can endanger both the mare and the foal.
  • Abnormal Foals: Even if twins are carried to term, they are often born weak and underdeveloped due to the shared resources in the womb.
  • Mare Health Issues: The mare can suffer from complications such as retained placenta, which can lead to severe infections.

Diagnosing Twin Pregnancies

  • Early detection of twin pregnancies is crucial. This is why the 14 day pregnancy check after breeding is so important. At this time, we can diagnose and manage twin pregnancies.
  • Ultrasound Scanning: A veterinarian can perform an ultrasound around 14 to 16 days post-ovulation to detect multiple embryos. If twins are identified, steps can be taken early to manage the situation.

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Management of Twin Pregnancies

Once twins are detected, it is highly recommended that the mare does not continue to carry both embryos and that one embryo is removed, or the pregnancy is terminated due to the high risk to the mare and foals in twin pregnancies.

  • Selective Reduction: This is the most common and effective method. One embryo is manually reduced via ultrasound guidance, allowing the remaining embryo a better chance to develop normally.

Twin pregnancies in horses present significant challenges and risks, but with early detection and appropriate management, these risks can be mitigated. Understanding and managing twin pregnancies effectively can lead to successful breeding outcomes, despite the inherent difficulties. If you plan on breeding your mare, make sure you follow the recommended pre- and post-breeding appointment plan from your veterinarian. It’s a lot of appointments, but for very good reason!

Until next week,

~Whinny

P.S. Have you listened to all of the breeding episodes on my Doc’s podcast? They have a number of different episodes about various aspects of breeding, and you won’t want to miss any of them! You can find them over on the Podcast Page of my website, or subscribe to Straight from the Horse Doctor’s Mouth on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts!

Whinny’s Wisdoms is the official blog of Whinny the Clinic Mouse at Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic in Newberry, Florida. If you liked this blog, please subscribe below, and share it with your friends on social media! For more information, please call us at (352) 472-1620, visit our website at SpringhillEquine.com, or follow us on Facebook!

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How to Weigh Your Horse

How to Weigh Your Horse

Whinny’s Wisdoms

Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic

Hi everyone, Whinny here! Horses are high maintenance creatures, have you noticed? They require a careful eye to make sure they stay healthy and in good condition. One of the ways you horse owners can monitor your horse’s health is to keep track of his weight.

Knowing how much your horse weighs will help you keep an eye on weight gain and weight loss through the seasons, so you can adjust his feed accordingly. If he is overweight, you probably know that he is at risk of developing laminitis – a serious concern. If he is underweight, you’ll have to figure out why. That could mean his diet needs to be changed, his teeth need attention, his worm load is too high, or several other health reasons. Keeping track of weight changes and making small adjustments early is definitely better than waiting until there are big, obvious health problems. It’s also important to know your horse’s weight so you can give medications such as dewormer correctly. You don’t want to overdose or underdose him.

But how to weight him? Unfortunately, you can’t just ask your horse to step on the bathroom scale. The good news is that there is an easy measurement you can do at home to get a pretty darn accurate weight for your horse. You may have seen my docs and techs do this when they come out to give your horse his vaccines. You can do it just as easily yourself! It doesn’t require any special equipment, just a flexible tape measure and a calculator (unless you really like long division). A metal tape measure isn’t bendy enough, but a fabric or plastic one with inch markings works great.

Here’s what you do:

  1. Stand your horse on a relatively flat surface. He should be standing “square”, with his legs placed evenly, not stretching one forward or back too much.
  2. Measure around your horse’s heart girth: Holding the “zero” end of the tape, place the other end of the tape over his back behind his withers (about where his mane ends). Reach under his belly and pull the end of the tape under his barrel about where the girth would sit. Bring the tape up to meet the end with the “zero”. The number on the weight tape where the “zero” meets is the heart girth number.
  3. Measure his length: Place the “zero” end of the tape at the point of his shoulder. Measure the length of his body straight back along his side to the crease between his muscles just below the point of his buttock.
  4. Plug your 2 measurements into this formula. Choose the right one based on whether he is an adult, a yearling, or a weanling.

 Adult horse weight in pounds = heart girth x heart girth x length divided by 330. For yearlings, divide by 301. For weanlings, divide by 280.

To make it easier for you to see this in action, here is Dr. Yorke with a video on how to do the measurements!

Until next week,

~Whinny

P.S. Have you subscribed to my blog yet? Don’t rely on Facebook to let you know when I write a new one. Just scroll down to the big purple box, put your email address in it, and I’ll email you my blog every Monday, a day before it goes out on social media. No spam, no ads, just the blog! Go on, be a good human! You can do it!

Whinny’s Wisdoms is the official blog of Whinny the Clinic Mouse at Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic in Newberry, Florida. If you liked this blog, please subscribe below, and share it with your friends on social media! For more information, please call us at (352) 472-1620, visit our website at SpringhillEquine.com, or follow us on Facebook!

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A Deep Dive Into Hay

A Deep Dive Into Hay

Whinny’s Wisdoms

Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic

A Deep Dive into Hay: Selection, Evaluation, and Storage for Optimal Equine Health

Greetings, esteemed equestrians and discerning horse enthusiasts! Whinny, your resident field mouse investigator, returns with a comprehensive exploration into the world of equine forage – hay. While the average farmyard observer might see just a pile of dried grass, we delve deeper to understand the intricacies of hay selection, evaluation, and storage for optimal horse health. Since hay forms the foundation of a horse’s diet, ensuring its quality through proper management is essential for responsible horse care. 

Deconstructing the Haystack: Grass Species and Nutritional Profiles

Beyond the basic categorization of “hay,” a multitude of grass species exist, each offering a distinct nutritional profile. Let’s dissect some prominent players:

  • Alfalfa: This nitrogen-fixing legume boasts exceptional protein (20-25% crude protein) and calcium content, ideal for supporting growth in foals, pregnant or lactating mares, and performance horses. Alfalfa is low in sugars which can make it a good option for horses prone to issues with sugar. However, because of the high calorie content it should only be a portion of the roughage for overweight horses (pronounced easy keepers). 
  • Timothy: The “gold standard” for many, Timothy hay offers a balanced combination of fiber and moderate protein (10-14% crude protein) levels. This makes it a staple for adult horses in moderate work or maintaining weight. Being a grass hay, sugar content can vary a lot based on conditions at the time of baling.
  • Orchardgrass: An increasingly popular option, Orchardgrass hay provides a balance between fiber and protein (10-15% crude protein) content. This makes it suitable for a wider range of horses, from performance animals requiring sustained energy to those needing weight gain compared to Timothy hay. It’s also palatable and easily digestible. Orchardgrass, much like Timothy, can have highly variable sugar content.
  • Bermudagrass Hay: A warm-season favorite, Bermudagrass hay is known for its high digestibility and fiber content. This makes it well-suited for horses in lighter work or residing in warmer climates, like Florida. It has a lower calorie content than the other three options here so can be a great option for overweight horses.

The Art of Hay Evaluation: A Multi-Sensory Approach

Identifying high-quality hay goes beyond just grabbing a random bale. Studies have shown that touch and smell can readily identify quality hay. Here’s how to transform into a hay evaluation extraordinaire:

  • Visual Inspection: Fresh hay boasts a vibrant color – green for legumes like alfalfa, golden brown for grasses like Timothy or orchardgrass. Avoid hay with excessive dust, signs of mold (indicating moisture damage), or a bleached appearance (signaling sun exposure).

  • Tactile Assessment: Dive in (figuratively, of course!) and feel the hay’s texture. High-quality hay should be pliable and soft, not brittle or dusty. The stems should snap with a slight bend, not crumble.

  • Olfactory Exploration: Engage your nose! Fresh hay should emit a pleasant, grassy aroma. Musty odors point towards spoilage from moisture or mold growth, while a sweet smell might indicate excessive sugar content.

  • Botanical Scrutiny: Keep an eye out for excessive weeds or signs of pests like insects or rodents (ahem, not that I would know anything about that). These can impact the hay’s palatability and potentially harbor contaminants.

Whinny Wisdom: Feeding hay in slow-feed hay nets will keep your horses occupied for longer without increasing their calorie intake, reduce wasted hay significantly, and keep their hay off the ground which will reduce their exposure to environmental contaminants like botulism, EPM, parasites, and more!

Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic

Hayven Secrets: Storage Strategies for Peak Quality

You’ve sourced the perfect hay – fantastic! But the journey doesn’t end there. Proper storage safeguards quality and prevents spoilage. Here are some expert-level storage tactics:

  • Environmental Control: Location is paramount. Select a dry, well-ventilated space with protection from rain and direct sunlight. Moisture is the archenemy of good hay! Aim for relative humidity below 60% to prevent mold growth. This can be tricky in humid environments like Florida. Buying less hay, so you can quickly rotate stock, can help.

  • Off the Ground: Don’t let your precious hay become a buffet for moisture and hungry critters like yours truly. Store bales on pallets or platforms, allowing for air circulation around them.

  • Bale Management: Consider the practicality of bale size. While large round bales might seem economical, they expose a larger surface area to potential spoilage and require specialized feeders to minimize waste. Small square bales offer greater manageability and reduce waste.

  • First-In, First-Out (FIFO) Implementation: Ensure a steady supply of fresh forage by adhering to the FIFO principle. Use older hay first to maintain a consistent quality for your horses. This principle should be used with everything your trusty steed consumes!

Conclusion: Hay There, Healthy Horses!

By understanding the intricacies of hay selection, evaluation, and storage, you will empower yourself to provide your horses with the optimal fuel for peak health and performance. Remember, a balanced diet starts with high-quality roughage, and a keen eye (and nose!) can make all the difference. Got more hay questions? My esteemed doctors and technicians can give you answers! Give us a call to schedule a nutrition consultation today! 352.472.1620.

Until next week!
~Whinny

P.S. If you want to learn more about equine nutrition, check out this video on my YouTube Channel about different types of feed! It’s something every horse owner needs to understand, just like hay. Make sure you explore my other videos while you’re there!

Whinny’s Wisdoms is the official blog of Whinny the Clinic Mouse at Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic in Newberry, Florida. If you liked this blog, please subscribe below, and share it with your friends on social media! For more information, please call us at (352) 472-1620, visit our website at SpringhillEquine.com, or follow us on Facebook!

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More Adventures of the Horse Doctor's Husband
Foals and Ascarids

Foals and Ascarids

Whinny’s Wisdoms

Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic

Spring is moving into summer, the rains are coming, and lots of new foals are running around fields. Some of these frolicking fillies are harboring some extra passengers though…

Let’s wriggle into the world of roundworms, known to smart medically-minded mice like me as ascarids!

What are Ascarids?

Ascarids are small parasitic worms that live in the intestines of horses. They are called roundworms because, well, they have a round shape. These worms can grow to be several inches long and can cause health problems for foals. However, it’s not like foals are out there gobbling up full-sized worms in the grass (though I wouldn’t put it past them!). So let’s go over the lifecycle of these pesky parasites, and how they wind up in our horses.

  1. Egg Production: The life cycle of equine ascarids begins with adult female worms residing in the small intestine of the horse. These fecund females produce large numbers of eggs, which are then shed into the horse’s feces. 
  1. Environmental Contamination: Once the eggs are passed in the feces, they contaminate the environment where the horse lives. This can include pastures, paddocks, or stalls where horses graze or spend time.
  1. Egg Development: In the environment, under suitable conditions of temperature and humidity, the eggs develop and mature over a period of several weeks to become infective larvae. This is dependent on temperature and humidity, but these eggs are quite robust and can often overwinter and remain infective on a pasture into the next foaling season. 
  1. Ingestion: Foals become infected when they inadvertently ingest the infective larvae while grazing, eating contaminated feed or water, or through grooming behaviors where they ingest soil or other environmental material containing the larvae. We all know foals put their mouths on everything, so this part isn’t very hard!
  1. Larval Migration: Once ingested, the eggs hatch and larvae begin hepato-tracheal migration, arriving in the lungs about 1 week post infection. Here, they penetrate the alveoli and bronchioles, where they remain for another 2 weeks before they are coughed up into the pharynx and swallowed to return to the small intestine as more mature larvae. The first intestinal stages appear 3–4 weeks post infection.
  1. Maturation to Adult Worms: Inside the intestines, the immature worms continue to grow and develop into adult worms over the course of several weeks to months. Once mature, they begin producing eggs, completing this crazy, complicated lifecycle and perpetuating the infection.
  1. Egg Shedding: Adult female worms release eggs into the horse’s feces, restarting the cycle by contaminating the environment with new infective eggs.

Symptoms of Ascarid Impactions

 When foals have a lot of ascarids in their intestines, they can actually lead to obstructions. Literally, a road block of worms! This can actually happen with live worms OR with dead worms after the foal has been given a dewormer. This is one of those (many) times when consulting with that veterinarian that you have a great relationship with about the best deworming protocol gives you the best shot at getting things right.

Sometimes even when we do everything right, those poor babies still end up with ascarid impaction. Here’s what that might look like:

– Swollen belly

– Not eating well

– Diarrhea

– Weight loss

– Lethargy

– High heart rate

Preventing The Impaction

There are some things that can be done to help prevent foals from getting infected with ascarids:

– Keep the environment clean: Regularly clean up manure and bedding to reduce the number of worm eggs in the environment.

– Deworming: discuss the protocol with our doctors, but often times they’re going to have you give dewormers every few months in a specific order and dose

– Fecal Egg Counts: if there is any question, just like with adult horses, we take a sample of poop and put it in our fancy machine to tell us how many and what type of parasites we have

– Quarantine new foals: Keep any new animals separate from others until they can be dewormed and checked for worms or other issues by our doctors.

Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic

Treating Ascarid Impactions

Here’s the scoop: these worms, when they get stuck, often have to be surgically removed. The surgery works a lot like other colic surgeries. Following surgery, the foal will be monitored closely at the hospital. It’s important for the referral docs to slowly reintroduce the foal to food and watch for signs of infection. This can often be a time and money-intensive process, but foals typically recover well from this surgery and go on to live happy, normal, lives.

Whinny’s Wisdom: Ensuring access to transportation for horses is paramount for all horse owners, but particularly crucial for those with higher-risk animals such as foals. Transportation facilitates timely access to veterinary care in case of emergencies, ensuring prompt treatment for any health issues that may arise.

Remember, failure to plan is planning to fail! If you are raising a foal, make sure you have a plan and a schedule worked out with your veterinarian to minimize risk on all health fronts. Foals are hard enough as it is, so don’t miss out on an opportunity to set yourself and your foal up for success!

Love and cheese,

Whinny

P.S. If you want to learn way more about parasites and deworming than this mouse can tell you, check out our podcast, Straight from the Horse Doctor’s Mouth! It’s free, and you can learn more than you ever knew you didn’t know by listening! Just click on the link to visit the Podcast Page of my website, or subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts!

Whinny’s Wisdoms is the official blog of Whinny the Clinic Mouse at Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic in Newberry, Florida. If you liked this blog, please subscribe below, and share it with your friends on social media! For more information, please call us at (352) 472-1620, visit our website at SpringhillEquine.com, or follow us on Facebook!

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Feline Hyperthyroidism

Feline Hyperthyroidism

Whinny’s Wisdoms

Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic

Whinny’s Guide to Feline Hyperthyroidism: Partnering with Your Vet to Keep Your Cat Happy and Healthy!

 Hello there, fabulous feline friends and their wonderful humans! (I know your cat is on your lap, no need to pretend they’re not!) It’s Whinny, your cheerful Springhill Equine clinic mouse, here to “whisker” you away into the world of cat health. Today, we’re diving deep into a topic that might sound a bit daunting, but fear not! With a sprinkle of knowledge and a dash of partnership with your vet, we’ll navigate through Feline Hyperthyroidism together.

Picture this: your sweet senior kitty, once a spry kitten, starts showing signs of weight loss despite having the appetite of a lion! It may start out subtle, and then one day you notice the furball on your lap is lighter than usual, and under the fluff you can feel ribs where you couldn’t before. Well, my dear cat-loving pals, this might be a classic case of Feline Hyperthyroidism. This condition isn’t new; it’s been around the litter box block for quite some time, especially in our older feline friends. But hey, just because it’s an oldie doesn’t mean we should ignore it!

Companion Animal Clinic at Springhill Equine

Uncovering the Signs

Let’s talk symptoms, shall we? Your furball might start shedding pounds faster than a cat chasing a laser pointer. Despite this disappearing act, their appetite might seem insatiable, leaving you scratching your head in confusion. Then there’s the restless nights, the unexpected hurling sessions, and oh, the constant trips to the water bowl! Another tell-tail sign? The yowling. These kitties are often vocal and loud. If your cat is displaying any of these signs, it’s time to whisk them off to your trusty veterinarian for a check-up.

Partnering with Your Vet

Now, my dear cat guardians, here’s where the magic happens – your partnership with your vet! Together, you and your vet will embark on a journey to uncover the purr-fect treatment plan for your feline friend. It starts with a thorough examination and some whisker-twitching blood tests to measure those pesky thyroid hormone levels. Things aren’t always clear cut on initial blood tests, so we may need to start with single values and move on to panels. Or, our docs can plan to run the whole shebang the first time. Go big or go home, I always say. Once diagnosed, we have some different treatment options. We can almost always find one that works for you and your feline.

Treatment Options

The most common medication prescribed to treat feline hyperthyroidism is called methimazole. This drug blocks the production of two different thyroid hormones; and as the name suggests, symptoms of hyperthyroidism are caused by too much thyroid hormone. As long as this medication is used appropriately, which means your kitty gets it every time they’re supposed to, it is just as effective as the other treatment modalities. Both oral and topical versions exist. With methimazole, we can adjust dosing easily and stop if we see any side effects. Most of the time kitties handle this drug just fine, but there is one side effect that will stop us in our tracks: facial itching. Less than 4% of cats taking methimazole experience this, but once they do, methimazole is a no-go forever.

Another option is feeding a prescription, iodone-deficient, therapeutic diet. A prescription diet called Hill’s Y/D is the only option for this, and the big thing to remember, my fellow feline enthusiast, is if you choose this treatment for your cat, you must be as strict as a drill sergeant that this is the ONLY food your cat eats. This is one of those all-or-nothing kind of situations.

Two more costly options are radiotherapy and surgery. Both of these occur at referral facilities and would involve further diagnostics before pursuing. While they are more expensive, they can both offer a good chance of permanent cure after recovery.

Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic

Bright Paws Ahead

But fear not, dear cat lovers! There’s light at the end of the litter box tunnel. With early detection and the purr-fect treatment plan, your cat can get back to chasing toys, lounging in sunbeams, and being the absolute ruler of their domain. So, let’s band together, humans and furry companions alike, and show Feline Hyperthyroidism who’s boss!

Until next week,

~Whinny

P.S. Have you subscribed to my blog? Don’t rely on Facebook to let you know when a new Wisdom posts, get it right in your email a day before everyone else gets it! Just scroll down to the big purple box and put your email address in it. You can do it, go on! Good human!

Whinny’s Wisdoms is the official blog of Whinny the Clinic Mouse at Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic in Newberry, Florida. If you liked this blog, please subscribe below, and share it with your friends on social media! For more information, please call us at (352) 472-1620, visit our website at SpringhillEquine.com, or follow us on Facebook!

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Stretches for your Horse

Stretches for your Horse

Whinny’s Wisdoms

Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic

Hey everyone, Whinny here! You probably know that stretching is a great idea to keep your body healthy, right? Same goes for your horse! Just like human athletes get ready for exercise with a warm-up, our equine athletes need to be prepared as well. Stretching can help to increase your horse’s flexibility, promote strength and balance, and reduce the risk of injury. It can help to loosen up joints, increase circulation through muscles, and enhance suppleness through the spine in his neck and back. If your horse is recovering from a musculoskeletal injury or neurologic disorder, your vet may also recommend specific stretching exercises as part of his rehab plan.

Stretches are great as part of your horse’s warm-up and cool down from exercise. They are most effective when your horse has been warmed up a little because his muscles will be more elastic and less prone to damage. The best times to stretch will be when your horse has done a short warm-up (about 10 minutes) or after he has finished exercising.

Plan on spending about 10 minutes on your stretching routine. Find a clear area on level ground that will give you and your horse a little room to move. Ideally, it’s great if you have someone else to hold your horse for you. Cross ties don’t work great for stretching, and you’ll need to be cautious if you choose to use them.

Begin with your horse standing square and balanced. Start slowly to get him used to the routine. Some of these positions may take some practice for your horse to understand how to hold them. You want him to enjoy the stretches and not be anxious, so asking for partial stretches in the beginning is just fine. Slow, gentle stretches are the most effective. It’s better to start with a small easy stretch and work on increasing the time and depth of the stretch as he becomes more comfortable. Pulling hard against a horse that is resisting you can cause injuries and make your horse nervous, so don’t fight with him. Just stop, give it a moment, and then ask for a lighter version of the stretch again. His flexibility and balance should increase over time, making it easier for him to perform the exercises. Repeat each stretch 3-5 times, allowing him a few seconds between stretches for his muscles to relax.

Here is a list of some basic stretches. You can do these stretches every day or perform different ones on different days. If your horse has any known musculoskeletal injuries, sites of pain, or difficulty balancing, be sure to talk to one of my docs before starting to make sure they are appropriate for him. Also, if you don’t feel safe doing some of these stretches for whatever reason, use your judgement to take care of your own safety and give them a skip if you aren’t comfortable.

Forelimb Stretches

  • Stretching the limb forward
    • This is great for stretching the muscles, tendons, and ligaments on the back of the limb, as well as muscles on the side of the trunk. Pick up the forelimb as you would to pick the hoof, then bring the lower limb forward and down until it is extended out in front. Keep the hoof low to the ground and if the horse strongly resists, do not pull against him to avoid damaging the soft tissues.

Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic

  • Stretching the forelimb backwards
    • This stretch focuses on the muscles in front of the shoulder and is great for horses with tense shoulder and chest muscles. Pick up the foot and place one hand in front of the knee. Your other hand supports the fetlock. Keeping the knee slightly bent and the hoof low to the ground but not touching, push the knee so the front hoof stretches towards the hind leg.

Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic

Hindlimb Stretches

  • Stretching the limb backwards
    • This stretch should only be performed on a horse that is well behaved for handling his hind limbs. Stand close to your horse (not behind him) and pick up the hind leg as if you were going to pick out the hoof. Slowly extend the leg back and downwards by pushing the fetlock out behind the horse. Don’t force this stretch or place any downward force on the hock.

  • Stretching the limb forward
    • Hold the back leg with one hand by the fetlock and the other hand on the foot or supporting the leg above the hock. Pull the leg forward until it is extended. Keep the foot low to the ground to avoid soft tissue injury, and don’t jerk back on him if he resists. A more advanced version of this stretch is the diagonal hindlimb stretch. Pick up the right hind leg from the left side of the horse, under his belly. Stretch the right hind leg down and forward toward the left front foot. Repeat with the left hind leg from the right side. Be careful to let go if your horse strongly resists and never force him.

Neck Stretches

  • Lateral stretches
    • Ask the horse to bend his neck to the left and the right. He may follow a treat to encourage this. The horse should bend his neck fluidly and evenly and your horse should bend his neck without tipping his head. Check that his ears stay even (see pictures). This may be difficult for some horses, especially if they have neck pain. If your horse tries to pivot his head to reach around, start with a smaller stretch, since the stretch is not as effective if he tips his head. Hold for 10-15 seconds if possible.

This next video is a demonstration of how NOT to do it! Notice the angle of the ears and head as he reaches for the treat. With his head nearly sideways, the stretch is not doing him any good.

  • Flexion (bowing stretch)
    • Stand near your horse’s girth, facing his head. Use a treat to ask him to stretch his head down to the level of his knees. The horse should bend evenly through the neck and round his back. Hold for 10-15 seconds. As he gets used to the stretch, you can ask him to reach between his knees or extend down between his fetlocks. He should round his back even more and may bend his knees a bit as the stretch gets deeper.

Back Stretches

  • Lower back flexion (hind end tucks)
    • Stand on the side of your horse’s hindquarters (not directly behind) and face forward. Use your fingers to scratch the muscle on either side of his hindquarters. He should round and lift his back, flexing the lower back and pelvis. Each horse will need a different amount of pressure to make him flex. Start with a light motion as some horses can be sensitive to this and you want gradual flexion.

  • Upper back lift (abdominal tucks)
    • Stand near your horse’s elbow, facing him. With your fingertips, apply firm pressure under the belly, a little behind where the girth would sit on midline. This will ask the horse to lift his sternum, contract his abdominals, and arch his upper back. You may need a little “tickle” with your fingertips or to press in your nails to get him to respond. Go slow and be cautious the first time you do this stretch. Watch the hind legs to be sure he doesn’t think you are a fly and kick forward at you.

  • Tail pull
    • Perform this one only if your horse is used to having his tail handled and you feel safe in the position. Hold your horse’s tail near the end. Standing behind him, steadily pull backwards at a slightly downward angle. You can lean backwards a bit and use some of your body weight for the pull. Hold for 30 seconds and repeat 3 times. Since the tail is connected to the spine and the muscles that stabilize it, this stretch can help to relieve pain and tension in the deep core back muscles. Many horses really enjoy the feeling of this stretch and will lean slightly forward to increase the traction to where they like it. Tail pull stretches have been shown in studies to decrease back pain in horses.

Lower Limb Stretches

  • Coffin joint
    • Holding the leg up by the cannon bone or pastern, let the hoof hang freely. Grasp the bottom of the hoof and gently twist back and forth like opening and closing the lid of a jar. The hoof should move an equal amount in both directions. This stretch encourages movement around the coffin joint and soft tissues surrounding it. It’s great to encourage free movement of synovial fluid inside the joint as well as flexibility of the joint capsule, tendons, and ligaments that stabilize the coffin joint and keep it functioning.

Until next week,
~Whinny

P.S. Our YouTube Channel is packed with great veterinary videos! There’s something for every horse owner, no matter what kind of horse you have! Make sure you like and subscribe so you don’t miss future videos 😊

Whinny’s Wisdoms is the official blog of Whinny the Clinic Mouse at Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic in Newberry, Florida. If you liked this blog, please subscribe below, and share it with your friends on social media! For more information, please call us at (352) 472-1620, visit our website at SpringhillEquine.com, or follow us on Facebook!

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More Adventures of the Horse Doctor's Husband
Whinny’s Guide to Keeping Horses Cool on the Road

Whinny’s Guide to Keeping Horses Cool on the Road

Whinny’s Wisdoms

Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic

Now, I, Whinny, wouldn’t claim to be an expert on horses. After all, I’m just a field mouse who’s taken up residence in a cozy corner of Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic. But between the hushed whispers of the vets and the whinnies of incoming patients, I’ve picked up a thing or two about these creatures. With summer coming, one topic kept cropping up – trailering in the heat.

Apparently, just like that shiny metal box humans call a car, the inside of a horse trailer can turn into a furnace on a hot day. Horses, unlike us nimble mice, can’t exactly pop open a window for some fresh air. And that’s where trouble starts.

Here’s the thing: horses sweat to cool down, just like humans. But unlike us, they need good airflow for that sweat to evaporate and keep them comfortable. Stuck in a stuffy trailer, that sweat just sits there, making things even hotter. My doctors say it can be 20 degrees hotter inside the trailer compared to outside – yikes!

And that’s not all. Did you know horses can’t cough properly with their heads held high? Imagine having a tickle in your throat but being unable to bend over and clear it! Apparently, the jostling of the trailer can send dust and hay bits flying, making a cough crucial. If the trailer doesn’t have enough space for a good head-low cough (or their head is tied too high), that tickle can turn into a serious respiratory problem down the road.

Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic

Speaking of down the road, even short trips can be stressful for horses. Studies, the kind my doctors love to quote, show that even a four-hour journey can send a horse’s stress levels through the roof. Their cortisol (the stress hormone) goes up, and their immune system takes a dive – not exactly ideal for facing new environments.

So, what can we do to help horses stay cool and comfortable on their summer adventures? Well, for starters, ventilation is key. Open all those vents and windows on the trailer, anything to get some air circulating. Think of it like my little burrow – nice and cool with plenty of fresh air coming through. If you can safely lock the dutch doors open, that’s even better. Just make sure you put a fly mask on them to protect their eyes from flying bits!

Whinny Wisdom: If the roof/ceiling of your trailer isn’t insulated, you might consider having some sort of insulation installed. There are several ways to do this, depending on how your trailer is designed. Spray foam, boards or panels, and liners are all options you can ask your local trailer shop about. An insulated roof makes an incredible difference in internal temperature. A good rule of thumb: if you can’t put your thumb on the ceiling of your trailer on a hot afternoon without getting burned, it needs some insulation!

Next up – water, water, water! Horses need to stay hydrated to regulate their body temperature. Frequent stops are a must, not just for filling up the gas tank but also for offering your equine friend a good long drink. A hose down might be appreciated too if possible.

Now, I may be a mouse, but even I know that ice melts. That whole trick of putting ice on the trailer floor to cool things down? Turns out, it’s a myth! The ice might cool the floor a bit, but it won’t do much for the overall temperature. Think of it like putting an ice cube in a hot cup of cocoa – sure, the ice itself will be cold, but the cocoa will still be steaming. Also, heat rises and cold sinks, so that’s a basic physics calculation.

There’s more to consider, of course. Trailer shade is important – parking under a tree or using a sunshade can make a big difference. Light-colored trailers absorb less heat, so that might be something to keep in mind for future trailer purchases (although, let’s be honest, that’s not exactly a quick fix).

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Here’s a bonus tip I overheard my doctors mention – electrolytes! These are like magic potions for horses, helping them replenish what they lose through sweat. A little electrolyte paste before the trip and some offered during rest stops can go a long way in keeping them feeling their best.

Remember, a happy horse is a healthy horse. By taking these precautions and planning your trip for cooler hours if possible, you can ensure your horse arrives at their destination safe, sound, and ready for new adventures. And that, from this little field mouse’s perspective, is a win-win situation!

So, there you have it! A crash course in keeping horses cool on the road, all from the perspective of a very curious field mouse. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I have some delicious crumbs waiting on me.

Until next week,
~Whinny

P.S. Our YouTube Channel is packed with great veterinary videos! There’s something for every horse owner, no matter what kind of horse you have! Make sure you like and subscribe so you don’t miss future videos 😊

Whinny’s Wisdoms is the official blog of Whinny the Clinic Mouse at Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic in Newberry, Florida. If you liked this blog, please subscribe below, and share it with your friends on social media! For more information, please call us at (352) 472-1620, visit our website at SpringhillEquine.com, or follow us on Facebook!

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Common Colic Myths

Common Colic Myths

Whinny’s Wisdoms

Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic

Hey everybody, Whinny here! Having had a horrible experience with a bad piece of cheese over the weekend, I sympathize with the horses our veterinarians see when they are having an episode of colic! As you may already know, colic is a general term for stomach pain in horses. I keep my whiskers tuned to the online horse world, and I’ve been hearing rumors and fibs that go around, making people worry even more! So, in this blog, we’re gonna tackle the top myths about colic in horses, setting the record straight and giving all you horsey lovers a clear picture of what’s what. Let’s dive in and sort out the truth from the tales!

Myth #1: Walking Helps Colicing Horses

There is an old tale that has led us to believe that walking helps fix a colicing horse. Unfortunately, walking does not help and can actually make a sick horse worse by expending energy and exacerbating dehydration in hot weather. It’s okay for horses to lay down and rest while waiting for the veterinarian to arrive, even if they are rolling.

The only time my docs advise you to keep them up is when they are violently throwing themselves down or are in danger of sticking their foot through a fence or wall and injuring themselves. They always use your own experience as a rule of thumb: what do you want to do when your stomach is upset? The answer usually doesn’t involve walking a 5k! Horses need all their energy to get them through the colic episode, so don’t make them burn it unnecessarily.

Myth #2: Mineral Oil Treats Colic

Administering mineral oil orally used to be a common practice in attempting to resolve colic. However, we have since learned that administering water with a “colic salt” solution helps break down impactions and re-hydrate horses more effectively. Occasionally, we will use some mineral oil in a horse that is impacted, or constipated, as a marker of GI transit time to determine when the impaction is resolved.

My docs have a video of a great experiment that you can do at home that really makes this clear. Put one piece of horse poop in a cup of mineral oil, and another piece of poop in a cup of water. Watch what happens over the next 30 minutes. Spoiler alert: the poop in the mineral oil doesn’t do anything, while the poop in the water falls apart! And that’s what needs to happen to an impaction in your horse’s GI tract.

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Myth #3: My Horse Eats Coastal And Has Never Coliced, So It’s Not An Issue For Him

Coastal hay is a lower quality and finer hay that has a higher incidence of colic. While many horses eat coastal hay without an issue, the risk is always there. To decrease the risk of colic while feeding coastal hay, we recommend feeding ¼ flake of alfalfa or peanut hay per flake of coastal hay. These types of legumes help increase gut motility, drive thirst, and generally push everything through the system with their leafy goodness.

¼ flake of alfalfa is about ¼ of a mega-calorie, so if your horse is an easy keeper, you can adjust his grain accordingly to maintain a good body condition score. If you want to learn more about calories in horse feed and hay, check out this video my docs made! It’s a great tool for helping you make adjustments to your horse’s diet without robbing them of vital nutrition.

Myth #4: Horses Need to Eat 24/7

While it is true that horses are grazing animals and consistent access to forage is essential for maintaining their digestive health, overfeeding or sudden changes in diet can trigger colic.

We see this all the time when a horse overindulges on a new round bale. Moderation and gradual transitions are key!

Using slow-feed hay nets will help you stretch less hay across more time. And when transitioning from hay to grass, or vice versa, do it gradually over a few weeks to help them maintain a routine and avoid system shock. Most horses don’t do any better at self-moderating at the buffet than you people do! (I won’t discuss the eating restraint of us mice).

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Myth # 5: Rolling Causes Torsion or Twisted Gut

While rolling is a sign of discomfort and colic, it does not cause the gut to twist. In a twist situation, the horse is rolling because he already has a torsion and is extremely painful from the displacement. Twists happen because the gut is spasming, like a major cramp, and has nothing to do with the orientation of the horse’s body. There are many instances of twists happening to horses who are standing quietly on the crossties or in their stalls, and are suddenly hit with high-level pain. These events are unpredictable and unpreventable, and there is no question when it’s happening.

Whinny Wisdom: If your horse suddenly freaks out and starts violently throwing himself on the ground, get out of the way and call your vet immediately! Horses in extreme pain are often focused solely on their discomfort, and may accidently injure you if you get in their space. In these situations, focus your efforts on the safety of the people and other animals in the area, and move items that the horse may injure themselves on.

 Colic is a distressing condition that demands careful management and swift action. However, separating fact from fiction is crucial to ensuring the best outcomes for our equine companions. Remember, always consult with your veterinarian for professional guidance and treatment. The longer you wait to act, the harder it will be to resolve the problem, and the more it will cost. Do yourself, your horse, and your pocketbook a favor and don’t wait if your horse is showing signs of colic.

Until next week,

~Whinny

P.S. Don’t forget to check out the videos I linked above! And if you like those, our YouTube Channel is packed with great veterinary videos! Make sure you like and subscribe while you’re there 😊

Whinny’s Wisdoms is the official blog of Whinny the Clinic Mouse at Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic in Newberry, Florida. If you liked this blog, please subscribe below, and share it with your friends on social media! For more information, please call us at (352) 472-1620, visit our website at SpringhillEquine.com, or follow us on Facebook!

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Got Milk? Got Risks: Navigating the Hazards of Raw Goat Milk

Got Milk? Got Risks: Navigating the Hazards of Raw Goat Milk

Whinny’s Wisdoms

Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic

Hiya everybody, Whinny here! As goat enthusiasts and farmers, we cherish the benefits of goat milk – its creamy texture, rich flavor, and nutritional value. However, it’s essential to recognize that raw milk can harbor harmful pathogens, posing risks to both goat owners and consumers. In this blog post, we’ll explore zoonotic diseases associated with raw goat milk and discuss safe milk consumption practices to mitigate these risks effectively. So, saddle up and prepare for a journey into the murky depths of milk safety, guided by yours truly. That’s right, this mouse knows more than just cheese.

Whinny’s Wisdom: A zoonotic disease is an infectious disease caused by a pathogen–like bacteria, viruses, or parasites–that can be transmitted between animals and humans. In other words, it’s a disease that can naturally spread from animals to humans, either directly through contact with an infected animal or indirectly sources like contaminated food, water, or vectors such as mosquitoes or ticks.

Zoonotic Diseases Contracted from Raw Goat Milk

  1. Brucellosis:

Welcome to the world of Brucellosis, courtesy of the notorious Brucella melitensis. Consume raw milk contaminated with this bacterial troublemaker, and you’re in for a rendezvous with fever, accompanied by joint pain and fatigue. Testing goats regularly and pasteurizing milk are your best bets for prevention. Brucella melitensis is officially not found in Florida, however we do have a different type of Brucellosis which resides in the feral hog population. The risk still remains for any consuming raw goats milk from areas outside the state or country.

  1. Campylobacteriosis:

Ah, Campylobacter jejuni – the unwelcome guest lurking in goat intestines. Ingestion of contaminated raw milk can unleash a torrent of gastrointestinal distress, including diarrhea and abdominal pain. Maintain rigorous hygiene practices to keep this bug at bay. Campylobacter can also be found in other types of raw food–raw chicken a common culprit. Many farm animals can harbor this bacteria with no visible symptoms, so it is wise to treat all as potentially infected. Centers for Disease Control reports estimate 1.5 million people are infected with Campylobacter in the U.S yearly –yep, your mouse did her research!

  1. Salmonellosis:

Enter Salmonella, the insidious intruder that can infiltrate goat milk with alarming ease. Imbibe raw milk tainted with Salmonella, and you’ll find yourself grappling with symptoms like diarrhea and fever. This bug is especially dangerous to anyone with a compromised immune system– so children, older adults, pregnant people, and those with immune-mediated disease. Rigorous sanitation protocols and pasteurization are non-negotiable in safeguarding your milk supply.

  1. Listeriosis:

Meet Listeria monocytogenes, the stealthy saboteur of the bacterial world. Consumption of contaminated raw milk can trigger listeriosis, a potentially severe illness characterized by fever and muscle aches. Maintaining impeccable farm hygiene is paramount in mitigating this risk. Listeria can also make goats sick, most commonly with a neurologic brain disease called encephalitis, but it can also lead to abortion.

Whinny Wisdom – A direct quote from the FDA: Pregnant women run a serious risk of becoming ill from the bacteria Listeria, which is often found in raw milk and can cause miscarriage, or illness, or death of the newborn baby. If you are pregnant, drinking raw milk — or eating foods made from raw milk, such as Mexican-style cheese like Queso Blanco or Queso Fresco — can harm your baby even if you don’t feel sick.* Click here to read the article

  1. Cryptosporidiosis:

Enter Cryptosporidium, the minuscule menace with a knack for causing chaos. Ingestion of raw milk contaminated with Cryptosporidium can lead to cryptosporidiosis, marked by watery diarrhea and nausea. Vigilant husbandry practices are essential to ward off this microscopic threat. Even so, don’t be surprised if you come into contact with crypto if you keep goats or cattle, especially in more intensive systems like dairies. These teensy tiny protozoal parasites are very hard to remove from the environment and remain infective for quite a long time. They are so prevalent, in fact, that crypto is considered a common infection (and reason for missed class) of vet students who work with livestock.

  1. Q Fever:

Brace yourselves for Q Fever, courtesy of the elusive Coxiella burnetii. Consume raw milk teeming with this bacterium, and you’re in for a turbulent ride marked by high fever, severe headache, chest pain, and other flu-like signs. Q fever can also be spread through birthing fluids, placenta, and aborted fetal material from goats and sheep. Not every person exposed to this bug will become ill, but those that do are typically down for the count for 1-2 weeks. Pasteurization and robust biosecurity measures during kidding season offer your best defense against this insidious foe.

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If I haven’t made you lactose-intolerant with my words, let’s talk about how to avoid these risks. Hint, it involves heat! Pasteurization is a widely used process that kills harmful bacteria by heating milk to a specific temperature for a set period of time. First developed by Louis Pasteur in 1864, pasteurization kills harmful organisms like those we’ve discussed so far. Don’t fret if you only have a few milking does and not a large factory. Pasteurization can be done relatively simply at home with a few simple tools!

Whinny Wisdom – Pasteurization does not change the nutritional value of milk, no matter what the sign at the Farmer’s Market says.

Pasteurization Process for Home Use:

  1. Wash hands and prepare a clean work area.
  2. Boil all containers and lids in water for at least 2-3 minutes to sterilize them.
  3. Using a double boiler, fill the bottom chamber with water and the top with your raw milk.
  4. Heat the double boiler up slowly on the stove. From here you have two options:
    • Heat the milk to at least 150F for at least 30 minutes
    • Heat the milk to at least 162F for at least 15 seconds
  5. Use a thermometer to monitor the temperature and stir the milk regularly. Do not rest the thermometer on the bottom or sides of the pot.
  6. If the temperature drops below the goal temperature at any point, you must start timing again.
  7. Put the top part of the double boiler in an ice water bath (don’t get water in the milk) to cool it fast. Stir the milk often to cool it faster, until it reaches 68°F or cooler.
  8. Pour the cooled milk into your sterilized containers right away and store in the fridge. It is recommended to label the containers with the date pasteurized.      So, there you have it – the raw truth about raw goat milk. While the allure of unpasteurized milk may be tempting, remember that safety should always reign supreme. So, embrace pasteurization, uphold impeccable hygiene, and savor your milk without the microbial mayhem. Stay smart, stay safe, and above all, stay vigilant, my fellow dairy enthusiasts! And if you aren’t subscribed to my blog, just scroll down a bit to the big purple box!

Until next week,

~Whinny

P.S. Do you know about the Companion Animal Clinic here at Springhill Equine? That’s right! Our clinic is a whole lot bigger than it used to be, and we now have a full small animal hospital! So in addition to your horses, donkeys, and goats, we’re ready to provide full veterinary care for your dogs and cats. Just give us a call to schedule your appointment at 352-472-1620. You can check out our new facility in this video:

Whinny’s Wisdoms is the official blog of Whinny the Clinic Mouse at Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic in Newberry, Florida. If you liked this blog, please subscribe below, and share it with your friends on social media! For more information, please call us at (352) 472-1620, visit our website at SpringhillEquine.com, or follow us on Facebook!

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Horse Manure Management

Horse Manure Management

Whinny’s Wisdoms

Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic

Howdy, fellow field friends! Whinny the clinic mouse here, back with another barnyard bulletin. Today’s topic? That ubiquitous pile in the paddock – horse manure! Now, I know what you’re thinking: Whinny, why on earth would you want to talk about… that? Well, my curious readers, horse manure is more than just a smelly mound. It’s a goldmine for both you and, surprisingly, the environment! But managing it effectively can be a real head-scratcher. So, let’s burrow in and learn all about the best ways to handle this… ahem… rich resource.

First things first, why is manure management so important? Imagine a world where all that lovely poop just sits there, piling higher and higher. Yuck! Not only would it be a real eyesore (and a nose-wrinkler!), but it could also create a breeding ground for nasty flies and parasites. Additionally, if not dealt with properly, manure runoff can pollute nearby waterways. Yikes! That’s why responsible horse owners have a plan for their “green gold.”

There are several ways to tackle this task, each with its own set of pros and cons. Let’s explore some of the most common methods:

Method #1: Spreading the Wealth

This might sound strange, but fresh manure can actually be a fantastic fertilizer! Packed with nutrients like nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, it can work wonders on pastures and gardens. However, there’s a catch (besides the, well, catch). Fresh manure can be too strong for plants and burn their delicate roots. So, the key here is to compost the manure first. Talk to your hay producer before using it for gardens. Some hay types are sprayed with herbicides which can damage garden plants even after being eaten, digested, and composted!

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Think of composting as a magical transformation. By piling up the manure with other organic materials like old hay, leaves, and kitchen scraps, and keeping it moist and aerated (turning it regularly is key!), you create a warm, happy environment for tiny decomposer bacteria and fungi to work their magic. Over time, these little critters break down the manure, creating a rich, nutrient-dense soil amendment that’s much gentler on plants. Plus, the heat generated during composting kills weed seeds and nasty parasites, making it a win-win! And if you use fly predators to help manage the flies, you know exactly where to place them: near that compost pile.

Composting does require the most work, but yields the best results over time. There are many ways to manage piles including leaving them alone for prolonged periods and aeration using bounce house blowers. It does require lots of space for those piles, and the fresh edges can be a breeding ground for flies. 

Method #2: Manure Magic with Machines

Now, let’s face it, composting takes time and effort. For some horse farms with a lot of… output… there might be a different solution: manure spreaders. These nifty machines attach to tractors or other equipment and allow for quick and efficient distribution of manure across fields. But remember, even with spreaders, it’s important to follow proper application rates based on soil tests to avoid nutrient overload. An added benefit is that manure dries out quickly when spread making it unsuitable for fly larvae to grow.

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One downside to the scoop and spread method is that it takes a lot to break down shavings. If you are spreading shavings, they pull a lot of nitrogen out of your soil while they’re decomposing, and that’s not good for your pastures. Another potential problem is that seeds that were in your horse’s hay are now being spread on your pastures, and you can end up planting a lot of unplanned things, depending on what all was in your hay besides hay.

Method #3: Calling in the Cavalry (or Should We Say, the Manure Hauler?)

Maybe your farm doesn’t have the space for composting, or perhaps you lack the equipment for spreading. No worries! Many areas have professional manure removal services. These folks come in with their trucks and trailers and whisk all that manure away.

Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic

It’s a convenient option, but keep in mind it can be the most expensive route. Much like composting, it also provides an ideal location to concentrate fly management strategies like fly predators and traps. The flies are attracted to the ideal location to eat and breed.

Bonus Tip: Location, Location, Location!

No matter which method you choose, remember that location is crucial. Manure piles shouldn’t be placed near wells, streams, ditches, or other water sources. This helps prevent potential contamination. Additionally, avoid spreading manure on frozen ground (not much worry in Florida) or during heavy rain (always a worry in Florida) – all that goodness will simply wash away and pollute waterways. 

The location should also balance being far enough away from the horses to keep the flies away, while also being close enough to get to conveniently. The single location makes that fly management much easier! Concentrating your efforts at the pile with things like fly predators, traps, and a black tarp over the pile to heat things up can really put a dent in those very annoying stable and house flies!

The Takeaway: Manure = More Than Just a Mess!

So, there you have it, folks! Horse manure management might not be the most glamorous topic, but it’s a vital part of responsible horse care and environmental protection. By utilizing these methods, horse owners can transform what some might see as a waste product into a valuable resource. Remember, a little planning goes a long way in keeping our barnyards (and our planet) healthy!

And hey, who knows? Maybe with proper management, that big, smelly pile could one day turn into a bed of beautiful flowers or a thriving vegetable patch. Now that’s something to think about next time you scamper past the paddock! 

Until next time, stay curious, my fellow field friends!
~Whinny

P.S. Do you know about the Companion Animal Clinic here at Springhill Equine? That’s right! Our clinic is a whole lot bigger than it used to be, and we now have a full small animal hospital! So in addition to your horses, donkeys, and goats, we’re ready to provide full veterinary care for your dogs and cats. Just give us a call to schedule your appointment at 352-472-1620. You can check out our new facility in this video:

Whinny’s Wisdoms is the official blog of Whinny the Clinic Mouse at Springhill Equine Veterinary Clinic in Newberry, Florida. If you liked this blog, please subscribe below, and share it with your friends on social media! For more information, please call us at (352) 472-1620, visit our website at SpringhillEquine.com, or follow us on Facebook!

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